What if we approached our spiritual wait the way we do with a natural seed? What if we reconsidered our perspective and took into account the spiritual harvest we could reap if we dug deep, planted the seed,watered and nurtured it and gave it time to grow? 

As the mother of a two-year old I spend a lot of time repeating myself, denying incredible (aka impossible) requests like driving to the moon and answering “why” a gazillion times a day to questions I have to research before I can adequately answer.

Lack of cuddles, snack, and/or nap can be enough to make tempers fluctuate throughout the day (mine and his). Cutting short a favoured activity or time with a missed friend (mine or his) and brink of Tantrumville, here we come.

But there’s something that always brings us back down to earth. A single word that grounds and roots us: “Patience”.

Ever since my son could understand me I’ve said “patience”whenever I need him to wait a little longer for something. Now, at two-years old, he says it to me. He knows to count if it’ll be a short while and to occupy himself if it’ll take longer than a few minutes.

The other night though, after counting and doing something else, and realizing he STILL had to wait, he finally asked the dreaded question: “But WHY do we have to be patient, Mommy?”

Stumped, I closed my eyes took a breath and said a silent prayer that whatever came to mind would make sense. And then it hit me…mothers day!

As part of a class project, my son gave me a basil plant in a small glass jar. He planted the seed himself and waters it. He notices when it’s grown and reminds me to give it sunlight. He knows we can’t pick it yet because we’re waiting for it to fully develop. Every day he enacts a certain level of patience. Still engaging in the process of seeing this plant grow without becoming anxious, annoyed or even bored because it isn’t happening fast enough.

Instead, he accepts the process and does what he can for now. Thanks to a great episode of one of his favorite children’s shows he knows that to uproot or pluck from the plant too soon could kill it forever. So he waits.

When I explained it that way, he was not only all ears, he translated it into his own kid speak: “The good stuff comes when we wait. I’m waiting Mommy. Are you waiting?”

If he only knew.

But it got me to thinking (some more): What if we approached our spiritual wait the way we do a seed? What if we reconsidered our perspective and took into account the spiritual harvest we could reap if we dug deep, planted the seed,watered and nurtured it and gave it time to grow? How much different would life be if we were just willing to wait?

I’m not condoning laziness and recommending people do nothing. Quite the contrary, waiting is an active process. Waiting requires preliminary work to have been completed. Waiting says that you’ve done your part and are expectant that whatever other parties need to get the job done will do so in divine time.

Often, we’re so afraid to let go and wait because we fear that those “other parties” (human or otherwise) won’t come through.

I’ve found more often than not in those situations, it means my work is not done. The very fact that I’m fearful is a sign that I’m not ready for the co-creation process…because co-creation at its very core is waiting.

Now whether more work literally means more labor, finishing touches and making changes to a project before turning it over or it means more introspection, growth, maturation and inner-peace, the point is that your fear is a great indicator of whether or not you’re ready to wait.

If you know you’ve done your best then trust yourself. If you don’t trust your co-creation partner in the process, do some soul searching and REALLY listen to yourself. Is it them you don’t trust, or is it still you?

I remember a friend once told me she didn’t trust her daughter because she thought the girl would disregard the house rules as soon as she got the chance. I asked if it was her daughter she didn’t trust, or her own parenting. If she trusted her parenting skills then all she had to do was wait. As it turns out, her daughter was more strict about enforcing some of those rules than her mom!

In short, when you trust yourself you can trust the process and everyone involved in it.

With trust, you can let go and wait. And as we know from the seed, waiting is a wonderful thing.

Which begs the question…what are you waiting for?

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